Some people consider the gnome usability guidelines a nuisance and some consider certain applications way too simplistic. While it is really hard to get the usability right, it's well worth it.

We need to keep in mind that as computer oriented people we tend to see things differently. Things that are simple to us aren't really that simple to the "normal people". But one of the simple things we can do the insure that the software we write serve the people it's designed for is to remove all not needed pop-ups and questions.

A good way to detect these would be to ask yourself why would a user choose anything else but the most logical option. It's kind of hard to explain, so lets pick an example:

Firefox is updated, the first question it usually asks after upgrade is about incompatible extensions. The user is presented with choices, check for updates or cancel. Now, we are dealing with internet browser so the user should be connected to the internet so there is no problem with checking for the updates, we can rule out that scenario. The other scenario that I can come up with is that a developer doesn't want to update some certain extension.

So at least I can't come up with any reasonable scenario why someone would want to select anything else but to upgrade the main option of upgrading the extensions. Why not just leave out the option and instead do the upgrade automatically. If you wish to be transparent, you can show the user that you are doing the upgrade. Or you can do like some applications do and just do it without bothering the user with the options.

I know I sound like a Google fanboy, but Google generally gets this right. Their applications skip out all upgrade related notices and just do the upgrade. Regular user doesn't want to upgrade because the user has been scared with incompatibility notices and upgrade checklists for so long. Just going ahead with the upgrade in complete silence keeps their software up to date as well.

Another example would be from few years back: The Ubuntu installation. Back in the day Debian was working on Debian Installer, which is also used as the main installer in Ubuntu alternative installation media. Debian Installer is capable of doing most things silently, but with Debian it by default asks a lot of questions. It doesn't matter, since most people who install Debian can be categorized as developers. But in my opinion, the thing that made Ubuntu a success was that it doesn't ask the questions that can be answered without asking the user.

So, back to usability. There are basically 2 camps, the "normal" users and the developers. Developers want and need to see a lot of the backend behaviour, just to debug problems. Currently a lot of the open source software is focused towards developers while they are gaining grounds on the "normal" population as well. We should start focusing on the users for a change.

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